Drinking Water. From the Ground Up.

The Lake Panorama Association Improves its Drinking Water Supply and Treatment System

The Lake Panorama Association is a private homeowners’ association with approximately 1,500 residential dwellings located around Lake Panorama near Panora, Iowa. The Association operates its own public works department, water supply and treatment facility, private security detail, road improvement crews and lake dredging crew.

Replacing an Aging Drinking Water System

The Lake Panorama Association’s aging water supply system consisted of a 3,000-foot-deep Jordan aquifer well and two shallower Dakota sandstone wells.

When the Association’s Jordan deep well failed, the susceptibility of the shallow wells to variations in weather left the Association and its residents vulnerable to potential water shortages. In addition, the aging water treatment plant building was in a state of disrepair.

In order to regain system reliability, the Association hired SEH to provide engineering design and construction services for a new Jordan deep well and upgrades to the water treatment plant.

image of equipment
The Lake Panorama Association’s well project required the use of specialized grouting equipment.

New Jordan Deep Well

Due to the depth of the well and the need for specialized grouting equipment, there were a limited number of contractors available and qualified to construct the well. In addition, because of the aggressive nature of the well water, the design required that the contractor use stainless steel for all of the well’s construction materials including the casing pipe, pump, motor, drop pipe and all of the couplings.

image of construction
The new building envelope was built on top of the old one to help ensure the drinking water system remained in operation during construction.

New Treatment Buildings and System Updates

The project also included replacing the water plant building and adding a hydrous manganese oxide (HMO) chemical feed system to remove radium from the water. The new water plant building was built on top of the old one to help ensure the water system remained in operation during construction.

Once the new building was completed, the old water plant building was disassembled and removed, and all of the water treatment equipment was refurbished

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